Press Releases

Museum of the Bible’s Newest Exhibition Explores One of Europe’s Oldest Noble Households Still in Existence

Published: Jul 20, 2018

Posted In: Press Releases

 

‘Noble Women and the Bible: Seven Stories in the House of Stolberg’ Explores How the Faith of Seven Women through the Ages Helped Establish a Family Dynasty

 

WASHINGTON Noblewomen and the Bible: Seven Stories from the House of Stolberg is one of the newest exhibitions to come to Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C. and runs from July – Sept., 2018. A noble family from Germany that began in 1210, during the Crusades and survives today with Philipp, current Prince of Stolberg-Wernigerode, together with more than 100 House of Stolberg descendants, is one of Europes longest surviving nobel households still in existence today.

While most museum exhibitions that focus on European nobility feature mostly men, Noble Women and the Bible reveals the stories of seven women of the House of Stolberg who lived between 1504 and 1955, highlighting how the Bible served as the guiding principle for their decisions.

As abbesses, countesses, princesses, wives and mothers, each of the seven women passed on the values of family and faith to generation after generation and helped establish a dynasty in the process. All were strong women closely connected to family and children, to war, violence and death. All found comfort, motivation and hope in the Bible.

“This exhibition is much more personal and intimate that your average museum experience,” says Dr. Gabriele Holthuis, lead curator of the exibition. “Because of the generosity of Prince Philip and our other lenders, visitors will have a genuine encounter with Anna, Juliana, Christine, Sophie Eleonore, Louise Maximiliane, Augusta Louise, and Magdalene. They will see their handwriting, their heartfelt letters, and objects precious to them. Guests will also get a rare glimpse at how war, political events, philosophies, and religious movements shaped the lives of these incredible women.”

 “We’re grateful to everyone who contributed to this project. It’s an amazing exhibition that I hope delights our guests as much as it has inspired its curators,” adds Dr. Holthuis.

In total, the exhibition spans 451 years of history and includes contributions from 15 lenders of more than 60 artifacts including personal letters, Bibles, books, jewelry, rosaries, and even a “treasure chest” from the 1700s with over 500 pieces of parchment, each inscribed with a biblical phrase or verse.

 Access to Noble Women and the Bible: Seven Stories in the House of Stolberg is included in general admission. Tickets to museum of the Bible are available for both general admission and group reservations. Tickets are required for entry and are available at: www.museumoftheBible.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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